Structure

Structure: S + N – T = Physical Health

Body structure is the supporting framework of bone, cartilage and muscle that maintains the internal space for organs and provides movement of appendiges and overall body motion. Bones are subject to the laws of physics. If any part of the structure is damaged or misaligned, the connecting structures have to accommodate or move in any one of six directions to try and maintain some semblance of ideal overall balance.

In our practice we see structure as THE foundation of dentistry. In addition to gums and bony structures around the teeth, we are concerned with the upper and lower jaw and its connection to the head and neck region. We know the occlusion, the bite must be structurally sound to handle the considerable bite force that occurs thousands of times a day in chewing, swallowing and exerting force.

Teeth can wear and shift and even loosen and fall out which changes the bite, which in turn can realign all of the connecting structure in the head and even down the spinal column. Over time, muscles accommodate to these new, out of balance positions, creating additional stress particularly on the TMJ joint where the lower jaw hinges. Unfortunately, even past dental procedures can be a source of occlusal misalignment.

Since the nerves and blood flow to the jaw and face move through very small openings in the skull, any structural misalignment can affect the nerves and blood flow to the brain and throughout the body.

Restoring structural balance to the bite and masticatory system is addressing the cause of many dental problems. Without this knowledge only the symptoms are seen and handled which may not lead to a lasting solution!

With the results of the K7 we can show you exactly how your bite “measures up” to what would be your ideal occlusal position . The ideal position acts as a guide to all future dental work with that patient, from crown placements to dentures to complete dental revision.

Without this information we would be restoring the teeth to an arbitrary location; looking at how they interface locally with each other or to a cosmetic standard, rather than to the correct structural position in relation to the rest of the skeletal network in its balanced position.

Read on: “Nutrition